Bandelier National Monument

If you’re ever near Los Alamos, New Mexico, stop in and visit Bandelier National Monument in the beautiful Frijoles Canyon.

The monument preserves the homes and territory of the Ancestral Puebloans of a later era in the Southwest. Most of the pueblo structures date to two eras, dating between 1150 and 1600 AD.” #wiki

Though there are over 70 miles of hiking trails, when we visited some years back, we visited only the Main Loop trail to see and tour the interesting cliff dwellings and the ruins of Tyuonyi (chew-OHN-yee) pueblo.

More info on the monument and park here:
History & Culture – Bandelier National Monument (U.S. National Park Service)

View of Tyuonyi pueblo ruins

View of Tyuonyi pueblo ruins

Pictograh and Viga holes

Pictograh and viga holes used to hold the dwellings’ supports

Frijoles Canyon

Frijoles Canyon view from inside a cavate

Inside the Came room

Inside the Came room (a.k.a. cavate)

Volcanic Tuff cliff

Volcanic Tuff cliff formed from the Jemez Volcano over one million years ago

Inside the Cavate

Inside the cacate – plastered walls and smoked ceilings.

Volcanic Tuff cliffs

Volcanic Tuff cliffs

Tree Cholla cactus

Cylindropuntia imbricata (Tree Cholla) cactus in front of Alcove House

More info on the monument and park here:
History & Culture – Bandelier National Monument (U.S. National Park Service)

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Golden Hour of Hope

“I don’t think of all the misery, but of the beauty that still remains.” Anne Frank

Huaca Pucllana

This was such a neat place to see right in the center of Lima, Miraflores. “possibly from Quechua wak’a a local shrine to a protector deity, a sacred place, sacred, pukllana game” #wiki. It’s very well preserved but there is also work being done to restore parts of the pyramid that do need repaired. Pre-Inca temple approx 400 AD, made of millions of clay/adobe bricks. There is a small portion of the grounds dedicated to a garden and pens for a few resident chickens, guinea pigs and of course llamas and alpacas.